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September 23 -- The state’s biggest utilities, in a milestone for New England’s wind power industry, have signed long-term contracts to buy wind-generated electricity at prices below the costs of most conventional sources, such as coal and nuclear plants. The contracts, filed jointly Friday with the Department of Public Utilities, represent the largest renewable energy purchase to be considered by state regulators at one time. If approved, the contracts would eventually save customers between 75 cents and $1 a month, utilities estimated. >>View Article

September 16 -- The rolling hills of northern New Hampshire are among the treasures of New England, and the prospect of an elevated power line cutting across the face of these ranges instinctively seems distressing. This sort of fear — of the destruction of natural beauty as well as the disruption to the local tourism industry due to this damage — has characterized the debate surrounding Northern Pass, a high-voltage transmission line being built by Northeast Utilities that will carry 1,200 megawatts of Canadian hydropower to the New England grid. The proposed route runs the length of New Hampshire, and much of the northernmost 40 miles will travel through forestland. It is understandable that the people of New Hampshire are concerned.  >>View Article

August 6 -- When the US Department of the Interior last week awarded a Providence-based firm the right to develop wind-power projects in 257 square miles of federal waters between Martha’s Vineyard and Block Island, the prospect of additional renewable energy wasn’t the only benefit for New England. The plans by Deepwater Wind, which won the US government’s first lease competition for wind energy development rights offshore, to plunge up to 200 turbines into the ocean beginning in 2017 should also establish southern New England as a hub for wind energy equipment and services. Offshore wind energy, in short, isn’t just an environmental boon; it promises to be an economic one as well. >>View Article

June 17 -- Hydropower could play a larger role in New England’s energy mix as five of the region’s states, including Massachusetts, move to import more of it — most likely from Canada — and at least one has passed a law that could allow electricity from large-scale hydrolectric dams to be classified as green as wind or solar energy. >>View Article

May 13 -- Massachusetts is leading the New England states in securing energy produced from resources such as the wind and the sun, as it tries to meet legislative mandates for renewable energy. But the commonwealth is also part of a coalition of states considering massive bids for renewables that could reshape the New England energy market. >>View Article

February 19 -- New England is experiencing a remarkable spike in electricity prices brought on by high heating demand and rising natural gas prices for electric generators. What role, if any, could renewable energy play in solving this problem? >>View Article

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