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ACORE Blog

By Dan Frakes and Alex Keros 08/02/2013

When developing a new type of vehicle and propulsion system, somewhere along the line infrastructure will be a major part of the equation and needs to be addressed. This article sheds some light into how infrastructure is playing a role in the development of electric vehicles, and how key partnerships with utilities and organizations like the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) are instrumental in the development of vehicles like the Chevrolet Volt and Spark EV.

June 19 -- Electric vehicles like the Nissan Leaf and Honda Fit EV used to languish on dealership lots for months. A pricing war with aggressive incentives and cheap lease deals has changed all that. >>View Article

May 21 -- Last week, Nissan announced that its electric vehicle, the Leaf, surpassed 25,000 in sales in the U.S. The industry-leading Chevy Volt reached that milestone last year. Over the weekend, John Voelcker, writing for Green Car Reports, estimated that more than 100,000 modern plug-in electric cars have been "delivered to a buyer somewhere in the U.S." >>View Article

Thursday, 18 April 2013 13:55

Toyota Predicts A Hybrid Majority

April 18 -- The man behind Toyota Motor Corp. first generation of hybrids — or vehicles that blend a gasoline-based engine and an electric motor — wasn’t always so confident that the cars would be a hit. “When the question of the future of hybrids first came up…I’d felt quite bold in saying that Toyota cars will be 30% hybrid by 2020,” former chief engineer and current vice chairman Takeshi Uchiyamada told reporters at a briefing in Tokyo on Wednesday. >>View Article

December 31 -- A group of students from Stanford University have been working on a new type of vehicle that will be powered by alternative energy. While this is not a new concept in the realm of transportation, these students are not focusing on hydrogen fuel cells or lithium-ion batteries, both of which are currently exceedingly popular in the auto industry. Instead, these students have set their sights on solar energy to power their ambitious new vehicle.  >>View Article 

December 13 -- Indianapolis intends by 2025 to become the first major U.S. city to replace its entire fleet with electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. >>View Article 

August 28 -- A BMW 1 Series costs more than $30,000. But for the price of a few gallons of gas, Bay Area residents can zip around in a purely electric version of the compact coupe using DriveNow, a electric-car-sharing service from the German automaker. >>View Article

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