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ACORE Blog

By Dan Frakes and Alex Keros 08/02/2013

When developing a new type of vehicle and propulsion system, somewhere along the line infrastructure will be a major part of the equation and needs to be addressed. This article sheds some light into how infrastructure is playing a role in the development of electric vehicles, and how key partnerships with utilities and organizations like the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) are instrumental in the development of vehicles like the Chevrolet Volt and Spark EV.

By ACORE's Transportation Associate Pete Metz

ACORE’s Transportation Initiative launched in early 2012 to position our organization at the intersection of the renewable energy industry and the transportation sector.  ACORE recognized this as an important opportunity for a number of reasons:

December 18 -- Gov. John Kitzhaber today released his 10-year energy action plan that focuses on improving energy efficiency and conservation, improving the state's clean-energy infrastructure and accelerating the transition to cleaner transportation options. >>View Article

November 6 -- NRG Energy (NYSE: NRG), through its eVgo subsidiary, has been cleared to provide Californians with the nation’s most comprehensive electric vehicle (EV) charging network including fast chargers that allow drivers to add 50 miles of range in 15 minutes at premier retail environments. With today’s Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) approval of the agreement between the California Public Utilities Commission and NRG, eVgo can now begin work on a network that will raise the bar on convenience for EV drivers. >>View Article 

October 24 -- In September, all new electricity generating capacity added in the US came from solar and wind.  Five wind projects totalling 300 megawatts (MW) and 18 solar projects for 133 MW were added, according to the latest "Energy Infrastructure Update" from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Office of Energy Projects. >>View Article

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