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Texas Is Wired for Wind Power, and More Farms Plug In

July 24 -- The wind is so relentless that a week can go by before it is calm enough for a crane operator to install the 30-ton blades atop the 260-foot towers at the Panhandle 2 wind farm here. It’s worth the wait; a single turbine at the farm can produce 40 percent more energy than an average one. >>View Article

Major Savings Seen on Electric Bills

July 24 -- Nevada utility customers could save hundreds of millions of dollars on their electric bills if the Nevada Legislature adopted energy savings standards as 26 other states have already done, a public policy group said Wednesday.

The Southwest Energy Efficiency Project has asked the Nevada Legislative Committee on Energy to seek a bill draft to get the Legislature to adopt the requirements, called Energy Efficiency Resource Standards, also known as EERS. The committee meets Friday. >>View Article

Faith, Business Groups Blast Proposed Fee on Solar-Equipped Homes

July 24 -- A growing chorus from across the sociopolitical spectrum is denouncing Rocky Mountain Power’s proposal to impose a monthly $4.65 fee on its net-metered customers — those who generate their own power from solar rooftop arrays and pipe what they don’t use into the grid. >>View Article

Solar Could Make State Shine

July 24 -- Massachusetts is extremely competitive with other states for solar development, ranking sixth in the country in terms of installed solar capacity and ahead of much sunnier states like Colorado and New Mexico.

But it hasn't always been that way. >>View Article

Court Ruling Encourages Corporate Investment

July 24 -- Renewable energy adoption is on the rise around the country. Corporate America is no exception. A majority of America’s largest companies have a clean energy goal, and they’re making serious investments to meet those goals. >>View Article

Profits heat up at Boise-based U.S. Geothermal

July 23 -- Six months of retirement was enough for Dennis Gilles.

He took overseas trips he'd had no time for in 23 years as an executive at California energy company Calpine Corp. He tinkered with his 1967 Ford Mustang at his home in Sonoma County. But drinks by the pool got old. He was bored.

So Gilles accepted a position in 2011 on the board at U.S. Geothermal, a tiny company in Boise. >>View Article

49ers' rooftop garden, solar energy propel Levi's Stadium to LEED gold status

July 23 -- Pedestrian bridges decked out in solar panels and a living roof ready for private parties and photo ops might not scream professional football.

But those green design elements and others at the San Francisco 49ers' new $1.3 billion Levi's Stadium on Tuesday helped land the team its long-sought LEED Gold certification at the Santa Clara venue, which officially opened with a ribbon cutting last week. >>View Article

Florida must face future and think solar

July 23 -- Re: "Solar power too costly for taxpayers," A. John Birkle, July 17. It goes without saying that Mr. Birkle's strong opinion about the cost of solar energy and about Babcock Ranch trying to maintain its right to run its own electric utility was shaped from a career spent in the fossil fuel based utility industry.

To be upfront about where I stand on the Babcock issue, I proudly lay claim to the fact that utilizing solar energy as the primary energy to create electricity for the new Babcock Ranch community was an idea I brought to the planning table while working for Syd Kitson. Since the economic downturn in 2007, I no longer work there nor do I work in the solar industry. >>View Article

Lou Cannon: Renewable Energy on Track Despite Setbacks

July 23 -- The relentless march of the states to greater use of renewable energy has hit some bumps on the road.

The biggest bump occurred in Ohio, where the Legislature last month approved a law delaying the state’s commitment to obtain 25 percent of its energy use from renewable energy by 2025. The Ohio measure was the latest battle in a regional assault on renewable standards by Republicans, who contend that green energy mandates are expensive and threaten economic growth.

In the Kansas Legislature, a measure to revise clean-energy standards was narrowly defeated, but proponents vow they will try again. In April, the Indiana Legislature took the dramatic, if largely symbolic, step of eliminating the state’s energy-efficiency standards.

The Ohio measure is “clearly a setback” for renewable energy, said Dick Munson, director of Midwest Clean Energy for the Environmental Defense Fund. But he does not see it as a lasting defeat. Munson observed that many other states are adhering to commitments to increase use of renewables or expanding these goals. >>View Article

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